SAM_headshot

Sam Tanenhaus

pressman

Michael Pressman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Essex Library

The Emmy Award-winning documentary, Best of Enemies, recounts the legendary debates between conservative William F. Buckley, Jr. and liberal Gore Vidal held in 1968 by ABC Television as part of their coverage of the national Democratic and Republican conventions. The film captures the dramatic context of American politics and culture that year and shows how the rancorous sparring in the debates inaugurated a revolution in television programming that not only survives but thrives today. Following the screening, Sam Tanenhaus, who appears as a commentator in the film, and Michael Pressman will discuss the Buckley-Vidal debates in the context of the ’68 election and the political issues of the day, how it was covered by the media, how the tenor of the debates and ratings for ABC affected future television coverage and gave rise to a Point/Counterpoint-style of television programming, and how the debate degenerated into the infamous name-calling.

Sam Tanenhaus, the author of bestsellers “The Death of Conservatism” and “Whittaker Chambers,” is working on a biography of William F. Buckley Jr. He was editor of the New York Times Book Review from 2004 to 2013.

Michael Pressman spent more than 30 years as a national broadcast journalist for both ABC News and NBC News, on programs that included: ABC News 20/20, Dateline NBC, the Brokaw Report, and the Today show. Mostly working in “long-form”—news magazines and documentaries—as a producer, director, and writer, he is the recipient of the Overseas Press Club’s Edward R. Murrow Award, Emmy, and Cine Golden Eagle awards.

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dumbarton-oaks-garden-fountainKarlGercens

Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C.

The Essex Library will welcome documentary filmmaker and six-time Emmy Award winner, Karyl Evans, who will screen her latest film and discuss Beatrix Farrand’s work with Landscape Architect Shavaun Towers who also appears in the film on Sunday, April 23 at 3 p.m. in The Cube at Centerbrook Architects’ office.

 

This compelling film is the first ever to chronicle the life of Beatrix Farrand (1872-1959), the niece of Edith Wharton and the most successful female landscape architect in early 20th century America. Farrand grew up in the privileged world of the East Coast elite and fought through the challenges of working in a male-dominated profession to design over 200 landscape commissions during her remarkable 50-year career.

The documentary includes never-before-seen archival materials and recent photographs of over 60 Beatrix Farrand related sites, taking viewers on an inspiring journey across the country to explore her personal story and many of her most spectacular gardens, including Dumbarton Oaks in Washington, D.C.; the Peggy Rockefeller Rose Garden at the New York Botanical Garden; Garland Farm in Bar Harbor, Maine; the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Garden in Bar Harbor, Maine; and her California gardens. The narrated film also includes interviews with Beatrix Farrand scholars.

Karyl Evans’ undergraduate degree is in Horticulture / Landscape Architecture. She earned her Master’s Degree in Filmmaking from San Diego State University. Ms. Evans was a full-time Professor at Southern Connecticut State University for two years, teaching film production and theory. Karyl is a Fellow at Yale University and is one of the organizers of the New Haven Documentary Film Festival at Yale.

Landscape Architect Shavaun Towers PLA, FASLA, graduated from Smith College with a BA in Architecture and received a Master of Landscape Architecture degree from the University of California, Berkeley. She is a founding Partner of Towers | Golde Landscape Architects in New Haven and has taught at Yale University Schools of Architecture and Forestry as well as the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

This event is free and open to the public. Advance registration is requested. Please call the Essex Library for more information or to register at (860) 767-1560. The event will be held in The Cube at Centerbrook Architects’ office at 67 Main St. in Centerbrook. Heartfelt thanks to our event co-sponsors: the Essex Garden Club and Centerbrook Architects.

legomovie

Thursday, June 19th at 3:30 p.m. in the program Room

“An ordinary Lego construction worker, thought to be the prophesied ‘Special’, is recruited to join a quest to stop an evil tyrant from gluing the Lego universe into eternal stasis.”  Rated PG; 100 minutes.

Join us for a special showing of this popular film. Pull up a chair at the library and enjoy the big screen! Children under the age of 12 must be accompanied by an adult.

Alice Herz-Sommer, 106, at her flat in London
Monday, June 16th at 3:30 p.m
. at Essex Meadows’ Hamilton Hall Auditorium

As the world’s oldest pianist and Holocaust survivor, 109 year-old Alice Herz Sommer kept her striking optimism throughout her long and challenging life, as well as her love for music. The Academy-award winning short film about her experiences, The Lady In Number 6: Music Saved My Life, was widely hailed as one of the year’s most uplifting and inspiring stories. The Essex Library, in conjunction with Essex Meadows, is proud to present a free screening of this wonderful film hosted by Ms. Mihae Lee. Lee, who is a world-renowned pianist and Artistic Director of the Essex Winter Series, will play some pieces by Chopin for the audience as well. Please plan to attend this special afternoon of music and film at Essex Meadows’ Hamilton Hall Auditorium, Monday June 16th at 3:30 p.m.. The program is free and open to all; Essex Meadows is at 30 Bokum Road in Essex.

For fans of Downton Abbey, the wait between Sunday evenings could try even the patience of a duchess. Below are suggestions for both novels and non-fiction to keep you busy between episodes of the Crawley household antics.

The Return Of Captain John Emmett by Elizabeth Speller
London, 1920. In the aftermath of the Great War and a devastating family tragedy, Laurence Bartram has turned his back on the world. But with a well-timed letter, an old flame manages to draw him back in. Mary Emmett’s brother John–like Laurence, an officer during the war–has apparently killed himself while in the care of a remote veterans’ hospital, and Mary needs to know why. Aided by his friend Charles–a dauntless gentleman with detective skills cadged from mystery novels–Laurence begins asking difficult questions. What connects a group of war poets, a bitter feud within Emmett’s regiment, and a hidden love affair? Was Emmett’s death really a suicide, or the missing piece in a puzzling series of murders? As veterans tied to Emmett continue to turn up dead, and Laurence is forced to face the darkest corners of his own war experiences, his own survival may depend on uncovering the truth.

Servants: a downstairs history of Britain from the nineteenth century to modern times by Lucy Lethbridge
From the vast staff running a lavish Edwardian estate to the lonely maid-of-all-work cooking in a cramped middle-class house, domestics were an essential part of the British hierarchy for much of the past century. Servants were hired not only for their skills but also to demonstrate the social standing of their employers, even as they were required to tread softly and blend into the background. But how did these countless men and women live? How did they view their employers and one another? And how did they experience the rapid social change of the twentieth century? In this “best type of history” (Literary Review), Lucy Lethbridge brings to life the butlers and lady’s maids, the nannies and cleaners whose voices have been largely ignored by history.

Lady Almina and The Real Downton Abbey by Fiona, The Countess of Carnarvon
Lady Almina and the Real Downton Abbey tells the story behind Highclere Castle, the real-life inspiration for the hit PBS show Downton Abbey , and the life of one of its most famous inhabitants, Lady Almina, the 5th Countess of Carnarvon and the basis of the fictional character Lady Cora Crawley.  Drawing on a rich store of materials from the archives of Highclere Castle, including diaries, letters, and photographs, the current Lady Carnarvon has written a transporting story of this fabled home on the brink of war.   Much like her Masterpiece Classic counterpart, Lady Almina was the daughter of a wealthy industrialist, Alfred de Rothschild, who married his daughter off at a young age, her dowry serving as the crucial link in the effort to preserve the Earl of Carnarvon’s ancestral home.  Throwing open the doors of Highclere Castle to tend to the wounded of World War I, Lady Almina distinguished herself as a brave and remarkable woman.   This rich tale contrasts the splendor of Edwardian life in a great house against the backdrop of the First World War and offers an inspiring and revealing picture of the woman at the center of the history of Highclere Castle.

Princesses Behaving Badly: Real Stories from History Without the Fairy-Tale Endings by Linda Rodriguez McRobbie
You think you know her story. You’ve read the Brothers Grimm, you’ve watched the Disney cartoons, you cheered as these virtuous women lived happily ever after. But the lives of real princesses couldn’t be more different. Sure, many were graceful and benevolent leaders–but just as many were ruthless in their quest for power, and all of them had skeletons rattling in their royal closets. Princess Stephanie von Hohenlohe was a Nazi spy. Empress Elizabeth of the Austro-Hungarian empire slept wearing a mask of raw veal. Princess Olga of Kiev murdered thousands of men, and Princess Rani Lakshmibai waged war on the battlefield, charging into combat with her toddler son strapped to her back. Princesses Behaving Badly offers minibiographies of all these princesses and dozens more. It’s a fascinating read for history buffs, feminists, and anyone seeking a different kind of bedtime story.

Park Lane by Frances Osborne
When eighteen-year-old Grace Campbell arrives in London in 1914, she’s unable to fulfill her family’s ambitions and find a position as an office secretary. Lying to her parents and her brother, Michael, she takes a job as a housemaid at Number 35, Park Lane, where she is quickly caught up in lives of its inhabitants–in particular, those of its privileged son, Edward, and daughter, Beatrice, who is recovering from a failed relationship that would have taken her away from an increasingly stifling life. Desperate to find a new purpose, Bea joins a group of radical suffragettes and strikes up an intriguing romance with an impassioned young lawyer. Unbeknownst to each of the young women, the choices they make amid the rapidly changing world of WWI will connect their chances at future happiness in dramatic and inevitable ways.

To Marry An English Lord by Gail MacColl and Carol Wallace
From the Gilded Age until 1914, more than 100 American heiresses invaded Britannia and swapped dollars for titles–just like Cora Crawley, Countess of Grantham, the first of the Downton Abbey characters Julian Fellowes was inspired to create after reading To Marry An English Lord. Filled with vivid personalities, gossipy anecdotes, grand houses, and a wealth of period details–plus photographs, illustrations, quotes, and the finer points of Victorian and Edwardian etiquette–To Marry An English Lord is social history at its liveliest and most accessible.

The titled Americans : three American sisters and the British aristocratic world into which they married by Elisabeth Kehoe
Elisabeth Kehoe brings to life a sweeping, three-generational saga of the remarkable Jerome sisters-among the most glamorous women of their time-whose marriages to British aristocracy represented the first of such transatlantic unions. Although full of princely lovers, parties, and landed estates, the story’s heart is the intensely supportive and beautifully affectionate lifelong relationship among the sisters. Waves of grave financial hardship afflicted them all, but they always rallied to rescue one another. Beginning in 1840s America and ending one hundred years later in the middle of World War II-when the British nation was fighting for survival under the leadership of Jennie’s son, Winston Churchill-this biography presents an epic story of family and fortune that encompasses both the apogee and the twilight of the British Empire.

Below Stairs: the classic kitchen maid’s memoir that inspired “Upstairs, downstairs” and “Downton Abbey” by Margaret Powell
Brilliantly evoking the long-vanished world of masters and servants portrayed in Downton Abbey and Upstairs, Downstairs, Margaret Powell’s classic memoir of her time in service, Below Stairs, is the remarkable true story of an indomitable woman who, though she served in the great houses of England, never stopped aiming high. Powell first arrived at the servants’ entrance of one of those great houses in the 1920s.  As a kitchen maid – the lowest of the low – she entered an entirely new world; one of stoves to be blacked, vegetables to be scrubbed, mistresses to be appeased, and bootlaces to be ironed. Work started at 5.30am and went on until after dark. It was a far cry from her childhood on the beaches of Hove, where money and food were scarce, but warmth and laughter never were. Yet from the gentleman with a penchant for stroking the housemaids’ curlers, to raucous tea-dances with errand boys, to the heartbreaking story of Agnes the pregnant under-parlormaid, fired for being seduced by her mistress’s nephew, Margaret’s tales of her time in service are told with wit, warmth, and a sharp eye for the prejudices of her situation.

Longbourn by Jo Baker
In this irresistibly imagined belowstairs answer to “Pride and Prejudice, “the servants take center stage. Sarah, the orphaned housemaid, spends her days scrubbing the laundry, polishing the floors, and emptying the chamber pots for the Bennet household. But there is just as much romance, heartbreak, and intrigue downstairs at Longbourn as there is upstairs. When a mysterious new footman arrives, the orderly realm of the servants’ hall threatens to be completely, perhaps irrevocably, upended. Jo Baker dares to take us beyond the drawing rooms of Jane Austen’s classic–into the often overlooked domain of the stern housekeeper and the starry-eyed kitchen maid, into the gritty daily particulars faced by the lower classes in Regency England during the Napoleonic Wars–and, in doing so, creates a vivid, fascinating, fully realized world that is wholly her own.

Daughter Of Empire: my life as a Mountbatten by Lady Pamela Hicks
Few families can boast of not one but two saints among their ancestors, a great-aunt who was the last tsarina of Russia, a father who was Grace Kelly’s pinup, and a grandmother who was not only a princess but could also argue the finer points of naval law. Pamela Mountbatten entered a remarkable family when she was born at the very end of the Roaring Twenties. As the younger daughter of the glamorous heiress Edwina Ashley and Lord Louis Mountbatten, Pamela spent much of her early life with her sister, nannies, and servants–and a menagerie that included, at different times, a bear, two wallabies, a mongoose, and a lion. Her parents each had lovers who lived openly with the family. The house was always full of guests like Sir Winston Churchill, Noel Coward, Douglas Fairbanks, and the Duchess of Windsor (who brought a cold cooked chicken as a hostess gift). When World War II broke out, Lord Mountbatten was in command of HMS “Kelly” before being appointed chief of Combined Operations, and Pamela and her sister were sent to live on Fifth Avenue in New York City with Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt. In 1947, her parents were appointed to be the last viceroy and vicereine of India and oversee the transfer of power to an independent Indian government. Amid the turmoil of political change, Pamela worked with student leaders, developed warm friendships with Gandhi and Nehru, and witnessed both the joy of Independence Day and its terrible aftermath.

Maisie Dobbs by Jacqueline Winspear
Maisie Dobbs isn’t just any young housemaid. Through her own natural intelligence and the patronage of her benevolent employers she works her way into college at Cambridge. When World War I breaks out, Maisie goes to the front as a nurse. It is there that she learns that coincidences are meaningful and the truth elusive. After the War, Maisie sets up on her own as a private investigator. But her very first assignment, seemingly an ordinary infidelity case, soon reveals a much deeper, darker web of secrets, which will force Maisie to revisit the horrors of the Great War and the love she left behind.

Rose: my life in service to Lady Astor by Rosina Harrison
In 1928, Rosina Harrison arrived at the illustrious household of the Astor family to take up her new position as personal maid to the infamously temperamental Lady Nancy Astor, who sat in Parliament, entertained royalty, and traveled the world. “She’s not a lady as you would understand a lady” was the butler’s ominous warning. But what no one expected was that the iron-willed Lady Astor was about to meet her match in the no-nonsense, whip-smart girl from the country. For 35 years, from the parties thrown for royalty and trips across the globe, to the air raids during WWII, Rose was by Lady Astor’s side and behind the scenes, keeping everything running smoothly. In charge of everything from the clothes and furs to the baggage to the priceless diamond “sparklers,” Rose was closer to Lady Astor than anyone else. In her decades of service she received one £5 raise, but she traveled the world in style and retired with a lifetime’s worth of stories.

At Home by Bill Bryson
Bill Bryson and his family live in a Victorian parsonage in a part of England where nothing of any great significance has happened since the Romans decamped. Yet one day, he began to consider how very little he knew about the ordinary things of life as he found it in that comfortable home. To remedy this, he formed the idea of journeying about his house from room to room to “write a history of the world without leaving home.” The bathroom provides the occasion for a history of hygiene; the bedroom, sex, death, and sleep; the kitchen, nutrition and the spice trade; and so on, as Bryson shows how each has fig-ured in the evolution of private life. Whatever happens in the world, he demonstrates, ends up in our house, in the paint and the pipes and the pillows and every item of furniture.

Serving Victoria by Kate Hubbard
During her sixty-three-year reign, Queen Victoria gathered around herself a household dedicated to her service. For some, royal employment was the defining experience of their lives; for others it came as an unwelcome duty or as a prelude to greater things. Serving Victoria follows the lives of six members of her household, from the governess to the royal children, from her maid of honor to her chaplain and her personal physician. Drawing on their letters and diaries–many hitherto unpublished–Serving Victoria offers a unique insight into the Victorian court, with all its frustrations and absurdities, as well as the Queen herself, sitting squarely at its center. Seen through the eyes of her household as she traveled among Windsor, Osborne, and Balmoral, and to the French and Belgian courts, Victoria emerges as more vulnerable, more emotional, more selfish, more comical, than the austere figure depicted in her famous portraits. We see a woman who was prone to fits of giggles, who wept easily and often, who gobbled her food and shrank from confrontation but insisted on controlling the lives of those around her. We witness her extraordinary and debilitating grief at the death of her husband, Albert, and her sympathy toward the tragedies that afflicted her household.

A Star For Mrs.Blake by April Smith
The United States Congress in 1929 passed legislation to fund travel for mothers of the fallen soldiers of World War I to visit their sons’ graves in France. Over the next three years, 6,693 Gold Star Mothers made the trip. They are strangers at the start, but their lives will become inextricably intertwined, altered in indelible ways. These very different Gold Star Mothers travel to the Meuse-Argonne American Cemetery to say final good-byes to their sons and come together along the way to face the unexpected: a death, a scandal, and a secret revealed. None of these pilgrims will be as affected as Cora Blake, who has lived almost her entire life in a small fishing village off the coast of Maine, caring for her late sister’s three daughters, hoping to fill the void left by the death of her son, Sammy, who was killed on a scouting mission during the final days of the war. Cora believes she is managing as well as can be expected in the midst of the Depression, but nothing has prepared her for what lies ahead on this unpredictable journey, including an extraordinary encounter with an expatriate American journalist, Griffin Reed, who was wounded in the trenches and hides behind a metal mask, one of hundreds of “tin noses” who became symbols of the war.

Gosford Park
Of course, before Julian Fellowes created Downton Abbey he wrote the script for the film Gosford Park. Intrigue during an old fashioned country house shooting party absorbs characters  above stairs and below.

Descriptive content provided by Syndetics™, a Bowker service.

Monday, December 30th at 2 p.m.
A holiday treat that makes an ideal introduction to opera for the whole family, the filmed version of the Metropolitan Opera’s performance of Mozart’s The Magic Flute will delight all ages. Julie Taymor’s visionary English-language production dazzles the eye; the music, directed by James Levine and sung by Nathan Gunn, Matthew Polenzani, Ying Huang, Erika Miklosa, René Pape, and Essex’s favorite bass-baritone, David Pittsinger, under the direction of James Levine, enchants the ear.

Please call the Library (860 767-1560) to register as seating is limited.

Friday April 12th at 7 p.m. at the Essex Town Hall

Filmmaker Jake Gorst, who also happens to be Geller’s grandson will speak about Geller (1924-2011), who designed hundreds of innovative and influential modern structures during an important era of 20th century creativity and expressionism. Geller’s association with industrial designer Raymond Loewy led to significant contributions to historic structures such as New York’s famed Lever House and The World Trade Center. His freelance vacation home architecture reflected a lighthearted playfulness and a mastery of the balance between fantasy and everyday reality. The Wall Street Journal architecture editorialist Alastair Gordon described Geller as the “architect of happiness”.

Gorst is an Emmy® award winning producer and director Recent film productions include the Emmy award-winning documentary, “Farmboy” (2006), currently in national PBS broadcast distribution, “The Rise and Fall of Books”, “Journeyman Architect: The Life and Work of Donald Wexler”, and associate production on “Andrew Geller: A Spatial Encounter”.
Take a look at the trailer for Modern Tide, directed by Jake Gorst.

centerbrooklogoClick here to see the entire Centerbrook Lecture Series schedule for 2012-2013.

Saturday, October 20th at 4 p.m.

What mysteries lurk in the old graveyard? What messages are hidden in its ancient tombstones? Join us for a walking tour of River View Cemetery with members of the Essex Historical Society . The walk will begin at the Essex Library, and families with children older than four are welcome to leave them for the duration of the walk at the Library, where we’ll show the holiday favorite It’s The Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown! Spooky good fun for adults, and a not-so-spooky good time at the Library for the little ones. Registration is requested for this program, please.

You’ve heard of them because of the Academy Awards: “Nominated for Best Foreign Film …” Or you read about small independent movies that were the hit of the Sundance or Toronto Film Festivals. But where can you get these movies? Every day at the  Essex Library.

Currently, there are more than 60 international films available for patrons to borrow. Our collection for the next three months includes movies such as:

  • “The Year Of The Yao” – before there was Lin mania there was Yao Ming, a Chinese basketball player who traveled from Shanghai to Houston to become a sports superstar.
  • “Immigration Tango” – a romantic comedy about Russian and Colombian immigrants who plan to swap partners with some American friends.
  • “The Girl Who Played With Fire” – the Swedish version of the hit series, soon to be followed by an American version of the same.
  • “Somers Town” – A Polish teenager and a runaway from Nottingham strike up a friendship over a hot summer in London.

Owned by the Connecticut Library Consortium, these films rotate between the participating lending libraries every 3 months. A Connecticut library card is all it takes to have a front-row seat.

Thanks to Librarian Marge Ruschau for help with this article.

HBO’s Game Of Thrones season 1 videos are a big hit at the Essex Library.  The books by George R R Martin are going like hotcakes too. We think one of the reasons for the popularity–beyond all the broad sword battles and porn, is the screenplay by David Benioff. Benioff, as you may recall, is the screenplay writer for other hits such as Brothers, The Kite Runner, Troy and 25th Hour (from his first novel, The 25th Hour) directed by Spike Lee. More importantly, we think, he is also the author of one of our favorite books: City Of Thieves.

City Of Thieves was published to wide acclaim in May, 2008. World War II’s siege of Leningrad provides the background for the story as two Russians, one a young soldier, the other a civilian teen, thrown together by chance, must find a dozen eggs in order to avoid being executed by a Russian colonel. The desperate search takes them out of the dangers of Leningrad and into the surrounding countryside where the two must learn to survive and the villagers aren’t much friendlier than the Germans– who will shoot them on sight. City Of Thieves is a terrific page-turner full of suspense, memorable characters, dark humor and a revelation at the end that will keep you humble for years to come. The audio version, read by Ron Perlman, is highly recommended.

So why hasn’t City Of Thieves been made into a movie yet?