JSBW2017PR3

Tuesday, March 12th at 7 p.m.

Just in time for St. Patrick’s Day, singer and guitarist Jeff Snow will put on a concert of Celtic music. Jeff’s concert will include songs and stories from Scotland, England and Ireland. He’ll play vibrant arrangements of traditional classics along with his own compositions on six and twelve-string guitars, autoharp, Celtic Bouzouki and Bodhran. Jeff’s concerts always delight their listeners who are welcome to clap and sing along.

Bald Eagles In Connecticut

February 19, 2019

EaglePicture1

Image courtesy of Paul J Fusco

Saturday, February 23rd at 2 p.m.

Did you know bald eagles usually mate for life? Did you also know that the female bald eagle is larger than the male, or that bald eagles hold the record for the largest nest? Please join us at the Essex Library for an illustrated lecture on bald eagles by Richard Taylor, Master Wildlife Conservationist from the CT DEEP Wildlife Team. The presentation will include the history, range, habitat, diet, nesting, breeding and recovery of bald eagles in Connecticut.

Richard Taylor is a retired Human Resources executive who formerly worked for General Dynamics and Computer Sciences Corporation.  Richard has had an interest in wildlife and fisheries his entire life and since his retirement, he completed Connecticut’s Master Wildlife Conservationist program and is now active volunteering and presenting programs on wildlife to libraries and non-profit organizations. He has a passion for education and continuous learning and has served as a Chief Learning Officer, a member of the Federal Committee on Apprenticeship and Rhode Island Vocational Council and has degrees and certifications from SCSU, RPI and Cornell.

This illustrated lecture is FREE and open to the public. For more information on our programs, see our Adults’ Featured Events page here: http://www.youressexlibrary.org/adult-services/adults-featured-events/

 

5seasonsMV5BODg0N2JjNTktOThkZC00ZjVkLWJiOGYtNGYxY2IyNmZkZjc5XkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyODc1MTUyOTY@._V1_UX182_CR0,0,182,268_AL_

Saturday, February 9th at 4 p.m and Wednesday, February 20th at 4 p.m.

For fans of Chicago’s Lurie Garden, New York’s High Line or any of Dutch garden designer Piet Oudolf’s other revolutionary garden designs, the Essex Library will screen the new documentary, “Five Seasons” twice in February.  Award-winning filmmaker Thomas Piper captures Oudolf’s “New Perennial” movement designs through the year and immerses viewers in his creative process including the beautiful abstract sketches, theories on beauty and ecological implications of his ideas in this 75-minute film. Viewers will enjoy discussions taking place through all fours seasons in Piet’s own gardens at Hummelo, and on visits to his signature public works in New York, Chicago, and the Netherlands, as well as to the far-flung locations that inspire his genius, including desert wildflowers in West Texas and post-industrial forests in Pennsylvania.

As a narrative thread, the film also follows Oudolf as he designs and installs a major new garden at Hauser & Wirth Somerset, a gallery and arts center in Southwest England, a garden he considers his best work yet. Piet Oudolf has radically redefined what gardens can be. As Rick Darke, the famous botanist, says to Piet in the film, “your work teaches us to see what we have been unable to see.” Through poetic cinematography and unique access, Five Seasons reveals all that Piet sees, and celebrates all that we as viewers have been unable to see.

Many thanks to the Essex Garden Club for their support with these screenings.

FS-Still-2

franceisafeastfrenchchefinamerica

Saturday, September 29 at 4 p.m.

Alex Prud’homme, Julia Child’s grandnephew, will present an illustrated talk on his two recent books. The French Chef In America: Julia Child’s Second Act, recounts the enchanting story of Julia Child’s years as a TV personality and beloved cookbook author and vividly describes the myriad ways in which she profoundly shaped how we eat today. Child was in her 60’s when she turned away from classical cooking and began to use recipes from around the world. It was then that she began to write in the first person instead of as The French Chef. France Is A Feast documents how Julia Child first discovered French cooking and the French way of life via intimate and compelling photographs taken by her husband Paul Child in France in 1948-1954.

Journalist and non-fiction author Alex Prud’homme began his writing career in 1988 after joining New York magazine as a fact-checker. He wrote many short articles there, and freelanced on the side, producing stories like “Slave,” a New Yorker piece about an irascible soup maven (later made famous by Seinfeld’s “Soup Nazi”). In the 1990s he moved to Business Month, where he profiled business leaders, to Time, where he covered national affairs, and to People, where he wrote crime stories. His articles have also appeared in The New York Times and Vanity Fair. He has written books about terrorism, the ImClone scandal, and the environment.

Copies of The French Chef In America and France Is A Feast will be available for purchase and signing. This event is FREE and open to the public. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 for more information or to register.

46407774_hrbyKatyClose

Wednesday, August 15th at 7 p.m. in The Cube at Centerbrook Architects  

Christopher Buckley’s father, an avid sailor, once owned a wooden sloop named Panic. In describing a few of William F. Buckley’s adventures at sea in the memoir “Losing Mum and Pup” he adds that his Mum often commented, “Bill, why are you trying to kill us?” In a special Essex Library event, Christopher Buckley will share details about a lifetime of sailing with his father: on Long Island Sound, across the Atlantic twice and Pacific once. Expect tears, laughter, the whole schmear.

Christopher Buckley is a novelist, essayist, humorist, critic, magazine editor and memoirist. His books include Thank You for Smoking, The Judge Hunter, and The Relic Master. He worked as a merchant seaman and White House speechwriter. He has written for many newspapers and magazines and has lectured in over seventy cities around the world. He was awarded the Thurber Prize for American Humor and the Washington Irving Medal for Literary Excellence.  Copies of The Judge Hunter will be available for purchase and signing.

This event is free and open to the public. Please call (860) 767-1560 to register.

bluebirds

Want to invite more wildlife to your yard? Join a park ranger and a wildlife biologist on Wednesday, April 11 at 6:30 p.m. for a how-to presentation on simple ways to bring birds, butterflies and other colorful creatures to your home. Learn what to feed birds, how to provide nest materials, which flowers to plant for butterflies – plus much more. With spring just around the corner, this is a great time to start planning! Free informational booklets and handouts will be provided to all attendees.

Kris Vagos works at Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge as a Wildlife Biologist.  She grew up in southern New Hampshire and attended Boston College for her undergraduate work in Biology and Environmental Studies.  After school, Kris volunteered and worked throughout the United States and other parts of the world.  She was a research assistant at the University of New Hampshire and got her Master’s degree in Natural Resource Management.  Her thesis project focused on what makes non-native shrubs invasive in New England.  Before moving to Connecticut, Kris lived along the southern coast of Maine and worked for the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge.

Shaun Roche is the Visitor Services Manager at the Stewart B. McKinney National Wildlife Refuge where he focuses on education and outreach. Shaun grew up in Waterbury and attended Central Connecticut State University where he earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in public history. He worked for the National Park Service at the Sagamore Hill National Historic Site in Oyster Bay, New York for more than six year before transferring to the Fish and Wildlife Service and coming back to Connecticut in 2011.

This program is free and open to the public. For more information or to register, please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560. The Essex Library is located at 33 West Avenue in Essex.

Sunken Gold, The

On Wednesday, April 4 at 7 p.m., Connecticut author Joseph A. Williams will visit the Essex Library to discuss the true story of the HMS Laurentic, which, laden with 44 tons of gold bullion was sunk by German mines off the coast of Ireland during the Great War.  Britain desperately needed that sunken treasure, but any salvage had to be secret since the British government didn’t want to alert the Germans to the presence of the gold. Lieutenant Commander Guybon Damant was the most qualified officer to head the risky mission. As the war raged on, Damant was called off the salvage to lead a team of covert divers to investigate and search through the contents of recently sunk U-boats for ciphers, minefield schematics, and other secrets. The information they obtained, once in the hands of British intelligence, proved critical toward Allied efforts to defeat the U-boats and win the war. Williams, a historian, archivist and librarian brings this exciting, true tale of undersea diving and early 20th century naval operations to life in the Essex Library on Wednesday, April 4 at 7 p.m. Copies of The Sunken Gold will be available for purchase and signing. 

Watch this book trailer about The Sunken Gold on YouTube here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFwk4sQ-DbA

This event is free and open to the public. Registration is advised. Please call the Essex Library at 860-767-1560 to register or for more information.

BurneJonesLoveSong1868-77Met2

Monday, January 8, 2018 at 7 p.m.
Following the Romantics, the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood took up four thematic arenas which were newly spiritualized since 1790: 1) the late Medieval Catholic past which the Pre-Raphaelites elevated to the highest level, 2) Woman as a refined, emotionally and spiritually intelligent object of male devotion, 3) an unsullied, pre-industrial Nature usually shown as a refined garden, a pastoral meadow, or a lush forest, and 4) the Arts themselves, especially music, poetry, painting, and architecture. Burne-Jones’ Le Chant d’Amour combined all four arenas in a particularly rich composition. Historically, it returned to an imaginary chivalry where “true love” existed far from mercenary London with its modern marriages of convenience. In its gender configuration, it placed a pure, glowing, aristocratic woman on an artistic pedestal against a distant cathedral and flanked by two male worshippers. As a landscape, it removed itself from the ugliness of modern London into a twilight arcadia combining a garden and a pastoral meadow. And aesthetically, it featured music, the art form universally hailed in the nineteenth century as more spiritual, universal, and emotionally charged.

This program is FREE and open to the public.

 

SAM_headshot

Sam Tanenhaus

pressman

Michael Pressman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, December 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Essex Library

The Emmy Award-winning documentary, Best of Enemies, recounts the legendary debates between conservative William F. Buckley, Jr. and liberal Gore Vidal held in 1968 by ABC Television as part of their coverage of the national Democratic and Republican conventions. The film captures the dramatic context of American politics and culture that year and shows how the rancorous sparring in the debates inaugurated a revolution in television programming that not only survives but thrives today. Following the screening, Sam Tanenhaus, who appears as a commentator in the film, and Michael Pressman will discuss the Buckley-Vidal debates in the context of the ’68 election and the political issues of the day, how it was covered by the media, how the tenor of the debates and ratings for ABC affected future television coverage and gave rise to a Point/Counterpoint-style of television programming, and how the debate degenerated into the infamous name-calling.

Sam Tanenhaus, the author of bestsellers “The Death of Conservatism” and “Whittaker Chambers,” is working on a biography of William F. Buckley Jr. He was editor of the New York Times Book Review from 2004 to 2013.

Michael Pressman spent more than 30 years as a national broadcast journalist for both ABC News and NBC News, on programs that included: ABC News 20/20, Dateline NBC, the Brokaw Report, and the Today show. Mostly working in “long-form”—news magazines and documentaries—as a producer, director, and writer, he is the recipient of the Overseas Press Club’s Edward R. Murrow Award, Emmy, and Cine Golden Eagle awards.

bobcatimage

Wednesday, May 3rd at 7 p.m.
Connecticut Master Wildlife Conservationist Paul Colburn returns to the Essex Library to offer a presentation on “The Bobcat: Connecticut’s Secretive Wild Cat.” Paul Colburn brings the elusive bobcat out of the shadows. This presentation focuses on the natural history of bobcats in Connecticut, providing an overview of bobcat habitat, diet, behavior, reproduction, and current research efforts.  The topic of mountain lions is also addressed, and bobcat artifacts will be on display.

This program is free and open to all. Please call the Library to register.