Whispersofthepast

Whispers Of The Past

SOUL OF THE LANDSCAPE celebrates the beauty and spirit of our woodlands and waterways, as seen in Whispers of the Past and its breathtaking view along the Connecticut River. Wnek’s work captures the light and details one might expect from a painting—which is no accident. He has long been inspired by the purity and innocence of the American landscape as portrayed by the 19th century Hudson River painters. “I strive for that same warm light, the luminous or stormy skies, to invoke a charm or a mood,” he explains.

Wnek’s photographs often reveal the story of the landscape—its whisper of bygone days, the intrinsic cycles of nature. With a focus on local scenes, this exhibit speaks to the beauty that surrounds us, the coastal vistas and woodland spaces that are unique to our state. In a familiar kaleidoscope of colors, see the rising and setting sun, the harmony of sky and land, the collusion of rock and sea. As Wnek explains, “I am intrigued by the soothing compositions and repetitive patterns that collectively reveal the Divine at work.”

Featured in this exhibit is Silver Glade, an image of trees on a ridge near Meriden. It recently won the Salmagundi Club of NYC’s 2015 “Henry O’Connor Award” for excellence, portraying the gentler, quieter landscape of New England. It is that voice of New England which Wnek most hopes to capture in his photographs, “those intimate moments of our own landscapes” waiting to be revealed.

This exhibit and sale will run for the month of Fenruary during the Library’s regular hours. A percentage of the proceeds of sales will be donated to the library. For more information, please call the Library at (860) 767-1560.

For more information about photographer Peter Wnek, visit www.PeterWnekPhoto.com.

tony 4.tifA photography exhibit will be held at Essex Library Association through the month of May featuring guest artist, Tony Donovan. Items in the exhibit will be for sale with the Essex Library receiving a 20% donation from each sale.

Ivoryton resident Tony Donovan began his photography career in Ireland in north Belfast in the early 1970’s. As he puts it: “It was a difficult place to take pictures, the people were on-edge and wary; suspicious of a stranger.” He shot street scenes and people he befriended, mostly children, with a handheld Leica and the available light. The situation was extreme since he had no control over events and that has shaped his work ever since. He considers himself a documentary, artistic photographer seeking to make expressive, poetic pictures from life. The photograph’s subject is the most important consideration for him.

Donovan has also captured woodsman Amos Congdon at his Lyme, CT sawmill. Congdon makes the perfect image of the American past; sharpening a saw, feeding cattle and tallying a woodlot. A sawmill is a wonderful place to take photos with its patterns of circles and squares, scattered pieces of wood and the lines lumber produces.

Donovan has been photographing a summer basketball tournament, more recently, for a number of years, even receiving a Middletown Commission on the Arts grant to do so in 2010. The Middletown Summer Hoopfest has offered Donovan the opportunity to record some of the drama, effort, spirit and grace played out in those games. He states, “Photography, like any creative process, often requires a subject that summons up in the artist the will and commitment to work over a long period of time. The Hoopfest has been such a subject for me. Certainly, these basketball images have an historic value and, hopefully, some of them attain a poetic worth.”

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???????????????????Chamberland, a twenty-one-year member and past president of the Essex Art Association lives in Ivoryton and has been bending and making paper, painting on silk and photographing abstract earthly elements for forty years.

She is an avid sailor. Her work is simple, graphic, often combining elements surrounding water. Chamberlands’ art mixes earth-bound images in mystical ways which host incongruous messages implanted in their titles. Edge is ever prevalent in her pieces, mixing color and contrast, enveloping the viewer to question.

Recently she has completed her first children’s novel, The Adventures of Minifred the Mouse”. The story brings the reader on a voyage from Liverpool to Boston during the 1848 Irish potato famine through the antics of a six month-old abandoned kitten and a smarty-pants shipboard mouse.