Mystery And Suspense Books You May Not Know About

December 14, 2009

For all our patrons who like mystery and suspense stories, we’ve put together a list of a few you may have missed and a couple that are new releases. Don’t forget to check out our New Release Alerts page to see what’s coming in new books and be first to place a hold on your favorites.

Ratking by Michael Dibdin

In this masterpiece of psychological suspense, Italian Police Commissioner Aurelio Zen is dispatched to investigate the kidnapping of Ruggiero Miletti, a powerful Perugian industrialist. But nobody much wants Zen to succeed: not the local authorities, who view him as an interloper, and certainly not Miletti’s children, who seem content to let the head of the family languish in the hands of his abductors — if he’s still alive.

The Chatham School Affair by Thomas H. Cook

Attorney Henry Griswald has a secret: the truth behind the tragic events the world knew as the Chatham School Affair, the controversial tragedy that destroyed five lives, shattered a quiet community, and forever scarred the young boy. Cook paints a stunning portrait of a woman, a school, and a town in which passionate violence seems impossible…and inevitable.

Motherless Brooklyn by by Jonathan Lethem

St. Vincent’s Home for Boys, Brooklyn, early 1970s. For Lionel Essrog, a.k.a. The Human Freakshow, a victim of Tourette’s syndrome (an uncontrollable urge to shout out nonsense, touch every surface in reach, rearrange objects), Frank Minna is a savior. A local tough guy and fixer, Minna shows up to take Lionel and three of his fellow orphans on mysterious errands: they empty a store of stereos as the owner watches; destroy a small amusement park; visit old Italian men. The four grow up to be the Minna Men, a fly-by-night detective agency-cum-limo service, and their days and nights revolve around Frank, the prince of Brooklyn, who glides through life on street smarts, attitude, and secret knowledge. Then one dreadful night, Frank is knifed and thrown into a Dumpster, and Lionel must become a real detective.

The Rainaldi Quartet by Paul Adam

Who would want to kill Tomaso Rainaldi, an elderly, unassuming violin-maker in the quiet Italian city of Cremona? For his friend and fellow violin-maker Gianni Castiglione, the murder is as mysterious as it is shocking. Rainaldi had few possessions, no enemies and little money. All he really had was an obsessive love of violins and an encyclopedic knowledge of them. But what if he knew more than anyone else – not just about famous violins, but about missing violins?

Dead Of The Day : an Annie Seymour Mystery by Karen E. Olson

A soggy April has hit New Haven, Connecticut-along with an unidentified body in the harbor. The strange fact that there were bee stings on the floater gives New Haven Herald police reporter Annie Seymour an intriguing excuse to put off her profile of the new police chief-a piece that becomes a lot more interesting when the subject is gunned down.

The Fate Of Katherine Carr by Thomas H. Cook

George Gates used to be a travel writer who specialized in places where people disappeared—Judge Crater, the Lost Colony. Then his eight-year-old son was murdered, the killer never found, and Gates gave up disappearance. Now he writes stories of redemptive triviality about flower festivals and local celebrities for the town paper, and spends his evenings haunted by the image of his son’s last day. Enter Arlo MacBride, a retired missing-persons detective still obsessed with the unsolved case of Katherine Carr. When he gives Gates the story she left behind—a story of a man stalking a woman named Katherine Carr—Gates too is drawn inexorably into a search for the missing author’s brief life and uncertain fate. And as he goes deeper, he begins to suspect that her tale holds the key not only to her fate, but to his own.

Death Wore White by Jim Kelly

Rookie detective Peter Shaw, along with his chain-smoking, hard-as-nails, veteran partner, is confronted with a baffling crime that stretches him to the breaking point.

Suspect by Michael Robotham

London psychiatrist Joseph O’Loughlin seems to have the perfect life. He has a beautiful wife, an adoring daughter, and a thriving practice to which he brings great skill and compassion. But he’s also facing a future dimmed by Parkinson’s disease. And when he’s called in on a gruesome murder investigation, he discovers that the victim is someone he once knew. Unable to tell the police what he knows, O’Loughlin tells one small lie which turns out to be the biggest mistake of his life. Suddenly, he’s caught in a web of his own making.

Mathilda Savitch by Victor Lodato Fear doesn’t come naturally to Mathilda Savitch. She prefers to look right at the things nobody else can bring themselves to mention: for example, the fact that her beloved older sister is dead, pushed in front of a train by a man still on the loose. Her grief-stricken parents have basically been sleepwalking ever since, and it is Mathilda’s sworn mission to shock them back to life. Her strategy? Being bad. Mathilda decides she’s going to figure out what lies behind the catastrophe. She starts sleuthing through her sister’s most secret possessions—e-mails, clothes, notebooks, whatever her determination and craftiness can ferret out.
The Echelon Vendetta by David Stone

CIA agent Micah Dalton is a “cleaner.” He takes care of other agents’ mistakes. When a friend and mentor commits a grotesque suicide, Dalton’s investigation leads him into the snare of a madman, into the arms of a beautiful, mysterious stranger-and into a conspiracy within his own agency. Dalton knows only one thing for certain-this job is going to get very messy.

Bryant & May On The Loose : a Peculiar Crimes Unit mystery by Christopher Fowler

The Peculiar Crimes Unit is no more. After years of defying the odds and infuriating their embarrassed superiors, detectives Arthur Bryant and John May have at last crossed the line. While Bryant takes to his bed, his bathrobe, and his esoteric books, the rest of the team take to the streets looking for new careers—leading one of them to stumble upon a gruesome murder. It isn’t so much the discovery of the headless corpse that’s potentially so politically explosive as where it’s found. Still it takes the bizarre sightings of a great horned creature—half man, half stag—carrying off young women to convince Bryant that this is a case worth getting dressed and leaving the house to solve.

The Ghosts Of Belfast by Stuart Neville

Fegan has been a “hard man,” an IRA killer in northern Ireland. Now that peace has come, he is being haunted day and night by twelve ghosts: a mother and infant, a schoolboy, a butcher, an RUC constable, and seven other of his innocent victims. In order to appease them, he’s going to have to kill the men who gave him orders. As he’s working his way down the list he encounters a woman who may offer him redemption; she has borne a child to an RUC officer and is an outsider too. Now he has given Fate—and his quarry—a hostage. Is this Fegan’s ultimate mistake?

Too Many Murders : a Carmine Delmonico novel by Colleen McCullough

The year is 1967, and the world teeters on the brink of nuclear holocaust as the Cold War goes relentlessly on. On a beautiful spring day in the little city of Holloman, Connecticut, home to prestigious Chubb University and armaments giant Cornucopia, chief of detectives Captain Carmine Delmonico has more pressing concerns than finding a name for his infant son: twelve murders have taken place in one day, and Delmonico is drawn into a gruesome web of secrets and lies. Supported by his detective sergeants Abe Goldberg and Corey Marshall and new team member the meticulous Delia Carstairs, Delmonico embarks on what looks like an unsolvable mystery. All the murders are different and they all seem unconnected. Are they dealing with one killer, or many?

Garnethill by Denise Mina Maureen O’Donnell wakes up one morning to find her therapist boyfriend murdered in the middle of her living room and herself a prime suspect in a murder case. Desperate to clear her name and to get at the truth, Maureen traces rumors about a similar murder at a local psychiatric hospital, uncovering a trail of deception and repressed scandal that could exonerate her – or make her the next victim.
An Expert In Murder: a new mystery featuring Josephine Tey by Nicola Upson

Traveling to London in 1934 to celebrate the triumphant final week of her play Richard of Bordeaux, popular writer Josephine Tey is caught up by the murder of a fellow train passenger, in a case that raises the suspicions of Detective Inspector Archie Penrose.

The Silent Hour by Michael Koryta

Twelve years after the failure of a Mafia daughter’s elaborate parole program at a luxurious estate, private investigator Lincoln Perry investigates the program founder’s disappearance and is alarmed to discover that an initial search was derailed by a murder.

The Crimson Rooms by Katharine McMahon

Still haunted by the death of her only brother, James, in the Great War, Evelyn Gifford is completely unprepared when a young nurse and her six-year-old son appear on the Giffords’ doorstep one night. The child, the nurse claims, is James’s, conceived in a battlefield hospital. Evelyn, a struggling attorney, must now support her entire family-at a time when work for women lawyers is almost nonexistent. Suddenly a new case falls in Evelyn’s lap: The accused-a veteran charged with murdering his young wife- is almost certain to die on the gallows. And yet, Evelyn believes he is truly innocent, just as she suspects there may be more to the story of her “nephew” than meets the eye. This book is due out on February 10, 2010.

Paganini’s Ghost by Paul Adam

Paganini – showman, womanizer, dazzling virtuoso – is one of the most charismatic characters in the history of classical music. His violin, il Cannone (the Cannon), is now kept in Genoa, Italy, where it is played only once every two years in a sold-out concert by the winner of an international competition. This year, though, a Parisian art dealer is found dead in his hotel room the day after the concert. In his wallet is a scrap of sheet music, torn from a page that belongs to the competition’s winner. But how did the dead man get hold of it? And why? Detective Antonio Guastafeste asks violin maker Gianni Castiglione to help him navigate the curious world of classical musicians, their priceless instruments, and the unsavory dealers who prey upon them.

The Red Door by Charles Todd

Set in post–World War I Lancashire, England, June 1920. In a house with a red door lies the body of a woman who has been bludgeoned to death. Rumor has it that two years earlier, she’d painted that door to welcome her husband back from the Front. Only he never came home. Meanwhile, in London, a man suffering from a mysterious illness first goes missing and then just as suddenly reappears. He is unable to explain his recovery. His family, supposedly searching for him, give conflicting accounts of where they were and why. What is the secret that nearly drove one man mad and turned his brothers and sister against one another with such unexpected savagery?

Midnight Fugue by Reginald Hill

It starts with a phone call to Superintendent Dalziel from an old friend asking for help. Gina Wolfe has come to mid Yorkshire in search of her missing husband, believed dead. Her fiance, Commander Mick Purdy of the Met, thinks Dalziel should be able to take care of the job. A Welsh tabloid journalist senses the story he’s been chasing for years may have finally landed in his lap. A Tory MP’s secretary suspects her boss’s father has an unsavory history that could taint his son’s prime ministerial ambitions. The ruthless entrepreneur in question sends two henchmen out to make sure the past stays in the past. And the lethal pair dispatched have some awkward secrets of their own.

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One Response to “Mystery And Suspense Books You May Not Know About”


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